Detroiters plan to dance, march, die-in during protest this weekend

A demonstration during Noel Night in Detroit last week.
A demonstration during Noel Night in Detroit last week. Photo by Steve Neavling.

There’s a popular chant during protests following the recent decisions by grand juries not to indict white cops for killing unarmed black men in New York and Missouri:¬†“We’re fired up; we won’t take it no more!”

It’s an increasingly popular sentiment in Detroit as protests have grown from a few dozens people committing minor acts of civil disobedience to hundreds descending on Noel Night in Midtown last weekend.

The protests are taking many shapes and have been attracting diverse crowds.
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Here are four events planned for Friday and Saturday:

  • Protesters are staging a die-in at Campus Martius at 12:03 p.m. Friday. Participants lie down to symbolize the unjust deaths of black people.
  • On the Riverwalk, protesters will gather at 10 a.m. Saturday for a “peaceful Detroit rally” that will include marching and a die-in. The organizer is encouraging people¬†to bring signs and resist acts of civil disobedience.
  • At 11 a.m. Saturday, people are invited to dance in solidarity with African Americans who have been killed by law enforcement. The dancing, which involves simple movements, will take place in front of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History at 315 E. Warren.
  • At 2 p.m. Saturday, a march is set to begin at Campus Martius. The event, called “Millions March Detroit,” implores people to “unite and go into the streets.”

Detroit police have been restrained and so far have allowed protesters to block streets as they march. Only a handful of arrests have been made in the past month after some protesters refused to leave a freeway.

The restraint is in stark contrast to the force shown by police in Berkeley, New York City and other cities, where unrest has since intensified.

Steve Neavling

Steve Neavling lives and works in Detroit as an investigative journalist. His stories have uncovered corruption, led to arrests and reforms and prompted FBI investigations.

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