At least 11 buildings, houses demolished around new Red Wings arena since 2014

By Steve Neavling
Motor City Muckraker

Since the city of Detroit announced the location of the new Red Wings arena in June 2013, at least 11 houses or buildings have been demolished within three blocks of the site.

But since the June 2013 announcement, Olympia Entertainment has yet to deliver on its pledge to redevelop the vacant property around the arena.

Here are nine buildings or houses that have been razed since May 2014:

Temple Hotel

The Temple Hotel, which served low-income residents, shut its doors in May 2014 after DTE offered more than $3 million for the property at Temple and Cass. The energy provider is building a substation on most of the block.

 

Temple-Street_1809

This trio of abandoned homes at Temple and Cass was demolished in October 2014 by a mysterious developer. The house on the left was a servant’s quarters. The middle property, a blonde brick Romanesque house, was built in the 1890s. The house on the right was converted into apartments in the 1990s. The site is now vacant.
cass corridor temple street

The remains of Temple after three houses and an apartment building were demolished.
Another Fucking Bar was demolished. By Steve Neavling/MCM

Demolished in April 2015, the red brick building at the corner of Park Avenue and Henry Street was easy to miss, inspiring the name of its last incarnation – Another Fucking Bar. Formerly known as the “2500 Club,” the bar was the city’s “most dedicated punk rock venue,” The Detroit News wrote in 2006. In 2009, the bar was sold and became “Another Fucking Bar” with a marquee that read: “Just what Detroit needs.” Beer was served from urinals, and food came in a dog bowl.
Hotel Park Avenue demolition_6984

After clashing with historians, Olympia Entertainment demolished the historic Park Avenue Hotel in July 2015 to make way for a loading dock. The 91-year-old building was designed by Louis Kamper and built alongside the Eddystone Hotel in the 1920s, when the lower Cass Corridor was teeming with fancy shops. But the area declined sharply after World War II, when white, middle-class residents began moving to safer neighborhoods and the suburbs. The few upscale apartments and hotels that weren’t demolished hung on by providing services to lower-income people. The Park Avenue Hotel became a senior complex and then a rehab center for drug addicts and homeless people.
Comet Bar at 128 Henry St.

The Comet Bar at 128 Henry attracted loyal patrons who were enamored by the modest, no-frills environment and live music. The bar closed in October 2014 and was demolished.
Cass Corridor houses_1853

This pair of long-abandoned houses on Cass Avenue was demolished about two months ago. Next to the houses was the Gold Dollar, a legendary bar that is now vacant.

Steve Neavling

Steve Neavling lives and works in Detroit as an investigative journalist. His stories have uncovered corruption, led to arrests and reforms and prompted FBI investigations.

  • maggiemay

    So what? Half of these buildings were abandoned and the others didn’t produce any income for anyone. What is the incentive for a developer to spend millions rehabbing old buildings when they won’t make a profit renting to low income residents? Illitch is in business to make money, he’s not a non profit. Seems you liked the Cass Corridor better when there were drug deals going down on every corner and drunks staggering around at all hours. Instead of bitching about it, why don’t you use your contacts to find homes for the people that have been displaced?

  • javierjuanmanuel

    What did houses in cass corridor sell for in the early to mid 80s ?

  • javierjuanmanuel

    Would you be upset if the redwings moved to the burbs?

  • Harry Palmer

    That area will be “flat lands” till further notice, just look at Park Ave to Clifford st., behind the Fox.
    If it isn’t a sports arena, Illitch isn’t interested in developing it.
    They’re not preservationists.
    Has anything been done with the Eddystone yet?
    My prediction is, it’ll be left crumbling for another couple of years, then demo’d.

  • Harry Palmer

    That area will be “flat lands” till further notice, just look at Park Ave to Clifford st., behind the Fox.
    If it isn’t a sports arena, Illitch isn’t interested in developing it.
    They’re not preservationists.
    Has anything been done with the Eddystone yet?
    My prediction is, it’ll be left crumbling for another couple of years, then demo’d.

    • javierjuanmanuel

      Fox theatre was not preserved ?

      What did he own, not for the arena that he neglected?

      • muckraker_steve

        He owns a bunch of properties along the arena site and along Grand River. He has done nothing with the buildings because he’s asking too much money for them.

        • javierjuanmanuel

          Are they neglected ?

    • javierjuanmanuel

      Fox theatre was not preserved ?

      What did he own, not for the arena that he neglected?

  • Dongald Trumpenis

    Yes, the Biff Tannen of Detroit has been razing old buildings.